Healthier Sounding Doesn’t Mean Healthier

Comparing healthy pizzas
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In case you didn’t know, Oprah makes pizza now. Well, she puts her name on a frozen pizza and sells it. And it absolutely seems like it’d be a healthy alternative to “normal” pizza, right?

You need to be very careful when it comes to labels. This is why I want you to be able to read the nutritional information & ingredients and make a decision on what food to buy based on what YOU want. Not based on the packaging.

Notice how the pizza on the left doesn’t explicitly say that it’s low calorie or necessarily healthier, but it absolutely wants you to think that. It’s described as “real, nutritious” pizza, touted as a cauliflower crust, and it’s got Oprah’s name front and center. Yes, the woman screaming about how much she loves bread on the weight watchers commercials. All these things seem like it would add up to a healthy pizza.

And then you have Digiorno. The frozen pizza that is never advertised as healthy, but as simply a frozen pizza you can make at home instead of ordering delivery. Turns out, it’s just as “healthy” as the other pizza, if not more-so (the serving size is slightly smaller, so I adjusted the macros to compare equivalent serving sizes)

Healthy sounding doesn’t always mean actually healthy. It’s all a part of marketing. By using a bunch of buzzwords, and in this case, advertising cauliflower (the cauliflower is only substituting 1/3 of the crust in this case, which is misleading) people are sure to flock to this pizza thinking they’re making a wise choice.

But at the end of the day, it’s just pizza.

Learn to read the nutritional information and make decisions on your own terms. These marketing tactics are everywhere- ice cream, pizza, cookies, etc. Throw certain buzzwords together and it’s easy to make a product sound healthy. Don’t let Oprah brainwash you. Even if she offers you a free car.

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