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Here’s How Many Calories Are In Every Type of Steak

Before we dive in here, I need to give a HUGE shoutout and thank you to “Beef- It’s What’s For Dinner” for working with me to get accurate nutrition facts and images for each cut of meat. If you need any more info about specific steaks, their website is the place to go!

In my search for accurate nutrition information for this post, I found many varying results for how many calories each cut of steak contains. Some sources show much higher calorie counts and fat content than I’ll be displaying here.

I was very surprised to see that these cuts are all pretty lean. These are up-to-date numbers reviewed and approved by the USDA, so you don’t need to worry about the accuracy.

Over the years, the demand for leaner cuts has increased, and these reflect the new standard trims you’ll find in retail.

Of course, you may come across different trims and levels of fat for each steak depending on where you are. Some restaurants may leave more fat on your Porterhouse for added flavor, as an example. But if you cut those fat caps off (since most of us will not be eating those) the remaining trimmed portion will be similar to the numbers you’ll find here in this breakdown.

 

What is a steak serving size?

Filet Mignon is surely not the same size as a giant T-Bone Steak, so how do you accurately assess a serving size?

For this comparison, we’re looking at 3 oz steak calories.

3 ounces may seem small, but that is the standard serving size for cooked meat.

That’s roughly the size of your phone or your palm. Here is a handy (pun intended) guide to help you estimate the portion size:

Visual portion size guide

I have a whole post about weight conversions for cooked vs raw meat, but to keep things simple, meat loses about 25% of its weight once cooked.

That means that 3 ounces of cooked steak are the same as 4 ounces of raw steak in terms of calories.

When you cook steak, it loses water weight, but the nutrition will remain the same.

If you buy steak from the grocery store, the nutrition facts will display information for 4 ounces of raw steak, so that is exactly what we’re looking at here.

The calories and nutrition for 4 ounces of raw steak are the same as 3 oz cooked steak calories.

If you go to a restaurant and order a steak, the sizes will vary greatly. It will totally depend on the type of steak you order, but generally speaking, expect a full portion of steak to be about 8-10 ounces.

You’ll likely consume 2-3 servings of steak in one dish, but it will depend on the specific cut of steak.

 

Is steak healthy?

Juicy Steak

Short answer: it sure is.

There are a lot of misconceptions that red meat is terrible for your cholesterol, and it’s not generally thought of as a low-calorie option.

When people think of steak, they often think of it as something you eat if you’re trying to get big and strong, and certainly not something to eat if you’re trying to lose weight.

As you’ll see in this post, steak can actually be a great option while on a diet.

While not every cut of meat is the same, as long as the steaks are trimmed, they are quite lean. With no carbs, and most trimmed cuts of steak being quite lean, steak is an amazing protein source.

Sure, the saturated fat & cholesterol in red meat may not be the ideal “diet food,” and it may not be as lean as grilled chicken, but as with anything else, moderation is always the key.

Unless you’re turning to the Carnivore Diet (please don’t), you don’t need to worry about having some red meat for dinner when you want it!

 

How many calories are in an average steak?

Remember, we’re going to look at cooked 3 oz steak calories, which is the same as 4 oz raw.

When you compare equal-sized portions, the average steak calories per serving will be around 160 calories.

If you break that down per ounce, we can conclude that one ounce of cooked steak has roughly 55 calories.

Calories in Every Type of Steak

How much fat is in steak?

Many people are shocked to see that the fat content of steak is not insanely high.

While it’s true that some cuts of steak contain a lot more fat than others, we don’t consume all of that fat. Once cooked, a lot of fat melts off of the steak, and when there is a large “fat cap” on a steak, we generally do not eat it.

Since there has been an increasing demand for leaner cuts of steak, you’ll also find that store-bought steaks are trimmed leaner than they used to be.

When we compare all of the popular cuts of steak, we can estimate that an average serving of steak contains roughly 8g of fat.

This means that every cooked ounce of steak will contain an average of 2.5g of fat.

 

How much protein is in steak?

Steak is an incredible source of protein, and no matter which cut you choose to go with, you’re going to get a ton of protein.

The average serving of steak will contain roughly 24g of protein, meaning that each ounce of cooked steak contains about 8g of protein.

 

Calories & nutrition for every cut of steak

Let’s explore each cut of steak and how it compares nutritionally.

Note that this list will not include every roast that is out there- to make the comparison fair, I wanted to stick with steaks that you’d throw on the grill.

While there are cuts of steak on this list that you can certainly roast or slow-cook, you may find that your favorite roast is missing here.

 

Bottom Round Steak Calories & Nutrition

Bottom round steak

180 Calories, 6g Fat, 0g Carbs, 29g Protein

Also Known As: Western Griller

This steak comes from the bottom round flat (also known as an outside round) which is the rump and hind leg area. This steak is a great cut for all purposes, and will work great as a full grilled steak.

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

Brisket Flat Half Calories & Nutrition

Brisket front cut

170 Calories, 6g Fat, 0g Carbs, 28g Protein

Also Known As: Beef Brisket Front Cut

The brisket flat half (commonly known as the first cut) is the leaner portion of the brisket. Brisket is best sliced or shredded, the two ways it is most often served.

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

Chuck Short Rib Calories & Nutrition

Chuck short ribs

200 Calories, 12g Fat, 0g Carbs, 24g Protein

Also Known As: Short Ribs, Braising Ribs

Beef short ribs can be found boneless or bone-in, and they are one of the fattier cuts you will find. Due to the higher fat, chuck short ribs are also one of the most flavorful and tender cuts of meat.

 

Cowboy Steak Calories & Nutrition

Cowboy steak

220 Calories, 14g Fat, 0g Carbs, 23g Protein

Also Known As: Cowboy Ribeye, French Rib Steak

The Cowboy Steak is a version of ribeye steak that is great for grilling. Due to its high fat content, it is a very tender cut of meat.

 

Denver Steak Calories & Nutrition

Denver Steak

180 Calories, 11g Fat, 0g Carbs, 22g Protein

Also Known As: Chuck Under Blade Stea

Denver steaks come from chuck, which is generally ideal for cuts of meat that you’d use for slow cooking. However, due to the marbling of Denver Steak, it’s best for grilling.

 

Filet Mignon Calories & Nutrition

170 Calories, 7g Fat, 0g Carbs, 26g Protein

Also Known As: Beef Loin, Tenderloin Steak, Side Muscle Off, Skinned; Chateaubriand Filet De Boeuf; Filet Mignon

Tenderloin is the most tender cut of steak you can get, which is why you’ll find it being so expensive! With very little fat, this is an incredibly healthy, lean option.

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

Flank Steak Calories & Nutrition

Flank Steak Calories

160 Calories, 6g Fat, 0g Carbs, 23g Protein

Also Known As: Beef Flank; Flank Steak Filet; Jiffy Steak; Plank Steak

Flank Steak is very thin, making it best for stir-frying! Flank steak is very long, but also very flavorful, making it a great choice when you have a recipe that calls for sliced beef.

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

Flat Iron Steak Calories & Nutrition

Flat Iron Steak

180 Calories, 9g Fat, 0g Carbs, 23g Protein

Also Known As: Boneless Top Chuck Steak; Book Steak; Butler Steak

The Flat Iron Steak comes from the chuck (shoulder), where some of the most flavorful beef comes from. The Flat Iron Steak is actually the second most tender cut (after the tenderloin), which makes it a great choice for grilling.

 

Eye of Round Calories & Nutrition

130 Calories, 3g Fat, 0g Carbs, 25g Protein

Also Known As: Breakfast Steak; Sandwich Steak; Wafer Steak

If you’re looking for a low-fat option, look no further than the Eye of Round! This cut comes from the hind legs, which are very lean and less tender. These steaks are less ideal for grilling, but great for roasts or as ground beef!

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

Porterhouse Calories & Nutrition

180 Calories, 9g Fat, 0g Carbs, 24g Protein

Also Known As: 1st Cut Porterhouse; King Steak; Porter House

Ah, the infamous Porterhouse Steak. If you’re looking for a big, meaty steak to order at a restaurant, this is definitely it. Since these steaks are so large, it is usually a perfect dinner to feed two people!

A Porterhouse is very similar to a T-Bone steak, but the Porterhouse has a larger tenderloin muscle. Nutritionally, you’ll find both very similar.

 

Bone-In Ribeye Calories & Nutrition

190 Calories, 10g Fat, 0g Carbs, 23g Protein

Also Known As: Ribeye Roll Steak; Ribeye Steak, 1″ Tail; Ribeye Steak, 2″ Tail; Ribeye Steak, Lip-On, Boneless

A Ribeye Steak is rich, juicy and full of flavor. Definitely one of the more popular cuts for grilling! The fat content is higher than other cuts of steak, but you’ll find that to be standard with any bone-in meat, because there is quite a bit of fat around the bone.

 

Ribeye Filet Calories & Nutrition

 

170 Calories, 8g Fat, 0g Carbs, 24g Protein

Also Known As: Ribeye Petite Steak; Saratoga Steak

If you want a Ribeye, but want something slightly leaner, Ribeye Filets are where it’s at. Fun fact: the name “Filet” is a French word meaning “a solid piece of meat.”

 

Skirt Steak Calories & Nutrition

200 Calories, 11g Fat, 0g Carbs, 25g Protein

Also Known As: Arrachera; Fajita Meat; Fajita Steak; Skirt Steak

Have you ever had fajitas? Of course you have! And if you’ve specifically had steak fajitas, then you’ve enjoyed yourself some Skirt Steak. Skirt Steak is a thin, flavorful cut (due to the higher amounts of fat) that works best seared over high heat. Ya know, like fajitas!

 

Strip Steak Calories & Nutrition

160 Calories, 6g Fat, 0g Carbs, 25g Protein

Also Known As: Ambassador Steak; Club Steak; Hotel Cut Steak; Kansas City Strip Steak; New York Strip Steak; Shell Steak; Top Loin Steak

Another steak that is great for grilling! With only 6g of fat per serving, the Strip Steak is a great option to enjoy, especially due to the slightly lower price tag.

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

T-Bone Steak Calories & Nutrition

180 Calories, 9g Fat, 0g Carbs, 23g Protein

Also Known As: Loin, T-Bone Steak; T-Bone

T-Bones are seemingly the go-to steak in movies or on TV. If you were asked to draw a steak, a big T-Bone is probably the first thing to comes to mind.

T-Bone steaks are very similar to Porterhouse steaks, but generally slightly smaller!

 

Top Round Calories & Nutrition

Top round steak

140 Calories, 3g Fat, 0g Carbs, 25g Protein

Also Known As: London Broil

The top round steak is very lean, and thus a pretty tough cut of meat. For the best flavor, slow-cooking this cut will give you the best result.

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

Top Sirloin Calories & Nutrition

150 Calories, 5g Fat, 0g Carbs, 26g Protein

Also Known As: Boneless Top Sirloin Steak ; Top Sirloin Butt Steak, Boneless; Top Sirloin Center-Cut Steak; Top Sirloin Steak Boneless Cap Off; Top Sirloin Steak Cap Off

Sirloin Steak is one of my personal favorites! It’s full of flavor, but still very lean, making it great for grilling. If I don’t feel like spending money on a tenderloin, this is the next-best thing!

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

Tri-Tip Calories & Nutrition

Tri Tip Steak Calorie

220 Calories, 13g Fat, 0g Carbs, 25g Protein

Also Known As: Newport Steak; Santa Maria Steak; Tri Tip; Triangle Steak

Tri-Tip Steak is NOT the same thing as Steak Tips, I came to learn! Steak Tips are one of my absolute favorite ways to enjoy steak- they’re basically lean cuts off the tip of the sirloin, and they’re magical.

Tri-Tip is a specific cut of sirloin, with its triangular shape giving it its name. In doing some research, I learned that it is actually very popular in California. Being a New Yorker myself, this is news to me, but I’m sure a ton of you reading this already knew that.

Considered Lean by the USDA: Contains less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat, and less than 95 mg of cholesterol (per serving)

 

Which is the leanest cut of steak?

The leanest cut of steak you can buy is either the Top Round Steak or the Eye of Round Steak.

Both of these lean cuts of steak contain only 3g of fat per 3 oz cooked portion, meaning each ounce of these steaks contains only 1g of fat.

The top round steak and eye of round steak both come from the round, which is the rump and hind leg portion. Since the muscles in this area are used for movement, it produces the leanest (but also least tender) cuts of beef.

 

Summary: how healthy is steak?

Growing up, I thought all steak was unhealthy. I saw all those huge, fatty steaks (like T-Bones) and knew that there was no way they could be healthy.

But after doing my own research and learning more about steak, it quickly became obvious to me that steak can be a GREAT option!

Sure, not all cuts of meat are the same. And while this guide shows some very lean meat, if you’re ordering steak, there is going to be much more fat involved.

At a restaurant, they may not do all the trimming because they want to leave those juicy “fat caps” on the steak. This helps the overall flavor (since fat melts a bit when cooked), but the odds are that you’re not eating that entire fat cap.

Use this guide as a reference, but know that it won’t always be 100% accurate. These are up-to-date nutrition facts from the USDA, but exact nutrition will always vary.

If you’re making steak at home, this should still be a great reference, as you’ll be trimming the meat to be as lean as you’d like.

But, generally speaking, steak is a great option for anyone looking for a lean protein source.

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