Food Scale vs Serving Size

Food scale vs measuring cup for weighing food
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Most people who track macros use a food scale, and it’s no surprise why. While following serving sizes on labels gives you a close idea, the actual measurements are going to be far more accurate.

Let’s look as a scoop of whey protein. You might be thinking “who cares if I scoop too much whey, it just means more protein!” But those extra calories can add up quickly if you are not careful. If a few of your foods throughout the day are larger than you think, even by 50 calories, you can quickly add hundreds of unaccounted for calories.

I took the photo on the left after taking a scoop of protein out of the container, and while it looks like “one scoop”, nutritionally it’s actually a scoop and a half! And while more protein is great, if you do this consistently you’ll get about 10 servings less out of your protein and your wallet will hate you.

If you just judge a serving based on one scoop, it is always going to vary slightly. But if you weigh it out, even if it doesn’t look like a full scoop, the calories will always be tracked correctly. 31g is 31g no matter how it looks.

If you don’t have a food scale, I definitely recommend buying one! You can find them for very cheap and they are so incredibly useful. Especially if you are following a recipe that uses weight measurements! You can follow the directions with measuring cups and spoons, but especially when we’re dealing with macro-friendly recipes that use healthy substitutions, the actual amounts are critical. A food scale takes out all the guesswork!

Do you use a food scale? At this point I can eyeball portions pretty well, but I still rely on my scale when I’m cooking. Plus, it stops me from eating 500g of peanut butter at a time.

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